Your Ballot. Your Vote. Do It Yourself.


MAIL-IN BALLOTING SHOULD BE AN OPTION, NOT A MANDATE

Governor Sisolak and the Democrats recently passed Assembly Bill 4 mandating mail-in voting ballots be sent to every active voter for the coming General Election on November 3rd.

They did it without consulting Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske, the state’s chief election officer, who already stated her intent to return to in-person Early Voting and Election Day voting, as well as absentee ballot mail voting.

The Democrats also approved ballot harvesting, which means ANYONE can collect mail ballots and turn them in for the voters. To be clear, I am totally against mailing a ballot to every voter and am especially concerned about ballot harvesting.

But if it’s going to happen, we all need to make sure we’re prepared to do our part to not only make sure our vote counts, but to make sure it’s an honest election that we can have confidence in the results.

1

Vote In Person

There will be polling places available to vote in person. As much as you are able, go vote. There will be COVID-19 protocols in place, but no more stringent than what we now encounter at the grocery store, getting our hair done or dining out

2

Don’t Give Your Ballot
To Anyone Else

If you have to vote by mail, find a way to get to a mailbox. Make sure you’ve filled it out correctly, signed the outside of the envelope and it’s sealed.

NEED A RIDE TO THE POST OFFICE? CALL ME AT (702) 812-0123 AND I WILL ARRANGE A RIDE SO YOU CAN MAIL IT PERSONALLY.

3

Fill Out Your Own Ballot

There may be canvassers at your door who will offer to take, or even fill out, your ballot for you. Fill out your own ballot and mail it yourself.

Every mailed envelope contains a valid ballot that can be counted as a valid vote if turned in. Help prevent fraud by removing unclaimed ballots that could be picked up and mailed in.

Call the Election Department at (702) 455-8683

News & Headlines

A selection of recent stories regarding mail-in ballot voting.

I always wanted
to make a difference

Whether as a teacher or a Metro Officer, or as an elected university regent or Las Vegas city councilman, Stavros Anthony has given almost 40 years of public service to the Southern Nevada community and the people who live here.